F!rosh Anti-Calendar Course Descriptions

APS100 - Orientation to Engineering

In this course you will have the opportunity to learn more about how to study effectively and manage your time while making time to relax and have fun. There will be guest speakers, including engineering alumini who will share their university experiences with you while also talking about their careers and how they made it to the big stage!

Important Skills

Time management, problem solving, communication.

Tips

  • Attend lectures and tutorials! This is one of the few classes that you receive marks for your attendance.
  • Participate in tutorials and don't be afraid to meet and talk to your peers.
  • Keep a positive attitude and remember, 'you get out what you give in'!

View Exams

APS105 - Computer Fundamentals

This course is the first taste of programming in C. It overs the basics of computer software and introduces concepts of programming algorithms, style, grammar, and debugging. This course sets students up for upper year programming courses, particularly in ECE, and can be challenging with a steep learning curve for those who don’t have programming experience.

Important Skills

Problem Solving, Theoretical Knowledge, Memorization.

Tips

  • Start labs early and give yourself 1-2 two more days than you think you will need.
  • Understand the fundamental concepts as exams test understanding and memorization will not always help.
  • Practice problems are key to getting the hang of programming so write labs on your own and try writing practice programs.
  • The textbook may not always be helpful but professors and TAs are, as well as Stack Overflow and other online help sources.

View Exams

APS111 - Engineering Strategies and Practice I

APS111 is an introduction to engineering problem solving. The course teaches the strategies engineers use to take client wants and turn them into needs. In it, students will become familiar with problem solving terminology, structure, and presentation. These elements are applied when students are placed in groups and asked to solve a design problem. The problem is designed specifically for the course, and is the same one given to all students.

Important Skills

Problem solving, Communication, Time management, Group work, Writing.

Tips

  • Attend lectures to get TopHat marks. These are a good chunk of your final grade.
  • TALK TO YOUR TAs and CIs. They are marking you and they will tell you what they want.
  • The textbook will save you on exams. Pay close attention to terminology.

View Exams

APS112 - Engineering Strategies & Practice II

This course is a continuation of APS111, where you are assigned a new group to work with, as well as a real client and a real-world problem. It will help to further develop your design and communication ability and understanding of the engineering profession. The lectures cover topics such as the design process, safety, project management, manufacturing, and intellectual property.

Important Skills

Memorizing, Group Work, Presentations, Writing.

Tips

  • Manage your time! This course has more work and higher expectations that APS111.
  • Seek advice from your TA and PM about issues with your client and group members.
  • Distribute responsibilities and follow a schedule.

View Exams

APS191 - Track One Seminar

This 0.15 credit seminar course is for TrackOne students. Each lecture will have presenters from different departments talk about the Core 8 disciplines. They consist of students, professors, and professionals, covering topics such as curriculum, career opportunities, and current research. The course is pass-or-fail, and credit is obtained from attending 70% of lectures.

Important Skills

Attendance.

Tips

  • Make an effort to attend every lecture as they offer a ton of information about disciplines for second year.
  • Try to narrow down which disciplines you are interested throughout the semester, since you will need to make a decision by the end of term. Pay attention! Presenters may offer insight into courses that you may not hear elsewhere.

View Exams

CHE112 - Physical Chemistry

This course is an extension of most high school chemistry with the addition of thermodynamics. However, the formulas catch up with you very quickly so make sure you pay attention in class and read the textbook carefully! Many topics and concepts including volatility and Raoults Law that are essential for chemical engineering.

Important Skills

Attendance, Practice, Problem Solving, Memorization, Theory.

Tips

  • Everything uses the same concept, so ask questions when you're confused about theory!
  • Consult past tests and papers for ample practice!
  • Textbook is very helpful and so are the practice questions, the textbook is your best friend!
  • Attend tutorials for bonus marks.

View Exams

CHE113 - Concepts in Chemical Engineering

A mish-mash of various engineering topics all encapsulated into one neat course focused on Chemical Engineering. You get a taste of some chemical engineering equations, a bit of electrical fundamentals and a lot of experience working in a lab. Practice makes perfect in this course and it is easy to do well if you pay attention in class.

Important Skills

Attendance, Group Work, Practice, Problem Solving, Theory.

Tips

  • Make sure you clarify by asking the professor and teaching assistants! Questions will help you learn in this class.
  • Attend lectures since there is no textbook and all the required material will be covered in the lectures.
  • Labs expose you to many different aspects of chemical engineering, so make sure you attend them and enjoy them.

View Exams

CIV102 - Structures and Materials - An Introduction to Engineering Design

This challenging course includes content normally taught in up to third year civil engineering, and provides an introduction to engineering analysis and design in general. Topics include material properties, beams, trusses, box girders, and concrete: concepts are often taught alongside their historical background to provide a sense of their relevance to society.

Important Skills

Problem Solving, Group Work, Theoretical Knowledge, Presentations.

Tips

  • Attend all lectures and make sure you take good notes in his lectures. Your notebook is your ""textbook"" and it is open book exam.
  • Do all problem sets and past exams!
  • Go to all tutorials and ask as many questions as you can.
  • TA office hours and review sessions are lifesavers."

View Exams

CME185 - Earth Systems Science

This course introduces basic concepts of geology that encompasses civil and mineral engineering. These concepts will be further investigated in the upper year courses. Such concepts include ID of rocks and minerals, analysis of topographic maps, differentiation between faults, folds and unconformities, impact of natural and manmade processes on earth's features and interconnections between its systems. Labs are done in groups and can be completed within the given time in practicals.

Important Skills

Problem Solving, Memorizing, Group Work, Theoretical Knowledge.

Tips

  • Attend all the lectures and tutorials because that's where mapping and problem solving are demonstrated.
  • It's best to stay in practicals longer to clarify your doubts with the professor and TAs.
  • Past tests and exams are really good indicators of what to expect on when being tested.
  • Terminology is key as there is a lot to remember (according to Professor Peterson).
  • ***NOTE: KP is leaving on sabbatical and there is a new professor this year so there may be changes.

View Exams

CSC180 - Introduction to Computer Programming

This course is intended to be a first introduction to programming and uses the Python language. It starts from the basics of coding and builds a foundation for CSC190, teaching how to properly structure code and think like a programmer. Topics include basic algorithms, recursion, searching and sorting, and runtime analysis. Labs are mandatory but with preparation it is possible to finish them quickly and leave early.

Important Skills

Problem Solving, Memorizing,Theoretical Knowledge.

Tips

  • Go to all labs and practice makes perfect.
  • Always test run your code.
  • Lecture slides are helpful, especially as a reference while you code.

View Exams

CSC190 - Computer Algorithms and Data Structures

This is a programming course building on CSC180, but is generally considered more time-consuming and challenging. It is taught in C rather than Python, and so requires a deeper understanding of what is actually happening and a greater attention to detail. Topics include memory allocation, data structures, and more advanced algorithms.

Important Skills

Problem Solving, Memorizing, Theoretical Knowledge.

Tips

  • Fairly big jump from CSC180 to CSC190
  • Ask for help early in you do not understand; the TAs may seem unapproachable at times but they will be glad to help you
  • Study theory well, and play around with implementing them to get more comfortable. Lots of problem solving "

View Exams

ECE101 - Introduction to Electrical and Computer Engineering

ECE101 is a seminar course that just aims to introduce you to the various streams and practical real-world applications of what you currently and will eventually study in ECE. People from academia, industry, and other fields will come to talk about their experiences.

Important Skills

Lecture Attendance.

Tips

  • Showing up for lectures is the only assignment. You have to go to a certain number to pass, so this should be a breeze.

View Exams

ECE110 - Electrical Fundamentals

ECE110 is the first course that introduces you to the electrical side of ECE. It's split into two halves: the first covers electromagnetic fields, and the second covers electrical circuits. Because of the breadth of the material covered and the wide range of challenging questions they can ask, it's generally considered one of more challenging courses in first year.

Important Skills

Problem Solving, Memorization, Theoretical Knowledge.

Tips

  • Go to lectures! The lecturers are generally good, and if you can't learn from yours effectively there are always other sections you can go to. Understanding the theory is key in this course.
  • The online homework (called WileyPlus) will be annoying as they'll be lots and they'll be frequent, however do try to complete them all and understand how to the questions.
  • Despite the difficulty of this course, the easier labs will almost guarantee you pass the course.

View Exams

ECE159 - Fundamentals of Electric Circuits

This course focuses on analyzing linear circuits by applying various constraints. Topics include basic building blocks of electric circuits, the relationships between current, voltage, power, and energy, steady-state and time-varying linear circuits, sinusoidal signals, complex numbers, and equivalent circuits. Many find the course difficult, though some feel that it is relatively easy at the beginning for those who have a strong background in electricity from high school.

Important Skills

Problem Solving, Theoretical Knowledge, Memorizing.

Tips

  • There are no tips for this course yet. Have any suggestions? Leave a comment!

View Exams

ESC101 - Praxis I

Praxis is the first year design course for Engineering Science, aiming to challenge students to design a solution to a problem using proper engineering design tools and mindsets. The course includes a device teardown, which involves taking apart a household appliance to analyze the engineering design decisions that went into it, a team design project in response to an opportunity chosen and refined by the team, as well as several smaller assignments including a design portfolio.

Important Skills

Problem Solving, Group Work, Writing, Presentations.

Tips

  • Focus on getting the most out of the course you can, and not on the grades.
  • Make good team dynamics a priority - it makes the experience so much more pleasant.
  • Take advantage of studio time to get feedback from the TAs.
  • Start every assignment early, you will thank yourself later.

View Exams

ESC102 - Praxis II

Praxis II builds upon what you learned in Praxis I and requires you to apply your design skills to a real-world engineering challenge affecting a community in the Greater Toronto Area. The first half of the course involves researching and framing an issue as an engineering problem in a Request for Proposal document, while the second half requires solving one of the problems proposed by the class and presenting your solution at a Showcase at the end of the term.

Important Skills

Problem Solving, Writing, Group Work, Presentations.

Tips

  • Bond with your group mates and find something you are all passionate about.
  • Do not focus on the marks, but rather the experience of tackling a real world problem.
  • Always ask feedback from the TAs, they are very helpful.
  • The best solutions do not have to be very technical or complicated, as long as it fits the frame of the problem.
  • Interact with your community often, you are after all helping them resolve an issue.

View Exams

ESC103 - Engineering Mathematics and Computation

Starting with linear systems of equations, the course moves to approximation methods to solve engineering problems. Topics include vectors, lines and planes, matrices and transformations, matrix inverses, eigenvalues and determinants, solving linear systems, curve fitting and least squares, numerical integration, and numerical solutions to differential equations. MATLAB sessions teach you how to use tools for numerical analysis at the end of the semester, and applications to other courses are introduced in assignments.

Important Skills

Problem Solving, Memorizing, Theoretical Knowledge.

Tips

  • Being able to visualize the geometry makes the vector unit trivial. Make sure you understand what matrices mean, how they work, and how to construct them.
  • If you can reproduce the exercises from the MATLAB tutorials, the MATLAB exam should be a piece of cake.
  • Khan Academy videos are helpful resources for this course.

View Exams

MAT185 - Linear Algebra

This course is centred around proofs of seemingly intuitive statements and demands logical thinking as well as intuition. Topics include vector spaces, determinants, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, diagonalization, and solutions to differential equations.

Important Skills

Problem Solving, Memorizing, Theoretical Knowledge.

Tips

  • Do the problems as they come out, and go to tutorial to see the official solutions. They are invaluable for the exam.
  • Get a good grasp of the theory and proofs. Having a good grasp of the logic of the proofs is very important.
  • Do the assignment early - even if they sound easy, they take more time than expected

View Exams

MAT186 - Calculus I

A continuation of grade 12 calculus, this course will introduce you to limits, derivatives, and integration. Midterms cover content from class and webwork while the most of the final exam covers content from the last chapter. Understanding theory and practicing questions is key!

Important Skills

Problem solving, Memorization.

Tips

  • Complete all webwork WITHOUT using online sources. If you find yourself stuck on a question, ask friends or ask a TA during tutorial.
  • Attend your tutorials, quizzes are marked on effort and participation.

View Exams

MAT187 - Calculus II

In terms of difficulty, workload, and transition from high school, Calculus II used to be similar to Calculus I, until they changed the instructor to good old Bernardo. The tests and online assignments are generally regarded as some of the hardest in first year, and is usually a big scare for first years. Topics include integration techniques, sequences and series, differential equations, and vector-valued functions.

Important Skills

Problem Solving, Memorization, Theoretical Knowledge, Group Work.

Tips

  • Beginning in the second semester of last year, they started implementing a group portion of the exams. Make sure you select your group early on and ensure that you can work together well.
  • Read the textbook! It will help you truly learn the backstage theoretical knowledge behind the material, and will help you on tests.
  • Do a wide range of problems, including all of the online homework, textbook questions, and as many past exams as you can. Note that MAT187 used to be called MAT197 in 2014 and before.
  • Don't let this get you down, as well as your other courses. Just try your hardest. Everybody in your class will struggle. There will be grade adjustments later, but don't depend on this."

View Exams

MAT188 - Linear Algebra

MAT188 takes high school algebra and stretches it literally, and figuratively. In this course students will learn more about vectors, linear equations, and determinants. Students will be introduced to eigenvectors, subspaces, matrices, orthonormal bases, and diagonalization. This course also includes WebWork and weekly quizzes.

Important Skills

Problem solving, Memorizing, Theoretical knowledge, Time management.

Tips

  • Do the webwork without help. It will force you to understand the material.
  • The solutions manual is so, so helpful. Use it.
  • Study for the quizzes, but don't be discouraged for doing badly.

View Exams

MAT194 - Calculus I

This course is an introduction to the theory and applications of differential and integral calculus, limits, basic theorems, and elementary functions. Topics include limit laws, differentiation, Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, Riemann sums, integration, differential equations, and proofs.

Important Skills

Problem Solving, Memorizing, Theoretical Knowledge.

Tips

  • Do value the Stewarts Textbook and do all the suggested problems.
  • This is one of the more difficult courses in first year, try to stay on top of things.
  • Time yourself completing problems to get some practice solving questions quickly. You will need to if you want to do well."

View Exams

MAT195 - Calculus II

This course builds upon MAT194 and is generally considered somewhat more difficult. It covers integration techniques, parametric equations, polar coordinates, infinite sequences and series, vector geometry, and multivariable calculus.

Important Skills

Problem Solving, Memorizing, Theoretical Knowledge.

Tips

  • Value the Stewart textbook and do the problems on them, especially the ones in the Problems Plus Section.
  • Get a good concept of the theory and how they are applied, the problems require lots of problem solving thinking.

View Exams

MIE100 - Dynamics

Expanding on knowledge from statics, this introductory course in classical mechanics will deal with physics in motion. Principles of kinematics and kinetics of particles and rigid bodies will be explored in addition to vibrations, and examples involving engineering applications will be analyzed.

Important Skills

Problem Solving, Theoretical Knowledge.

Tips

  • Be sure to understand the basic concepts as exam questions are not usually repeated and your understanding plays a major role in attacking this new problems.
  • In addition to understanding the concepts do a lot of past exams and text book problems while timing yourself. This will provide an exam like atmosphere and can help identify areas for improvement.
  • Attend office hours, PASS sessions, or rewatch lecture captures if you need further clarification.

View Exams

MIE191 - Introduction to Mechanical and Industrial Engineering

This is a seminar course wherein professors and industry professionals in mechanical and industrial engineering give talks about the work, challenges, and opportunities in their respective fields. It is intended to help MIE students make informed decisions in second year when choosing their stream options, as well as provide them with examples of real, applied engineering work they may encounter within the discipline. The course is pass-or-fail, and credit is obtained from attending 70% of lectures.

Important Skills

Attendance, Open-mindedness.

Tips

  • No tests or quizzes. Purely attendance based.
  • You only need to attend 9 of the 12 lectures.
  • Ask questions to the presenters, since they may help you decide which stream to choose in third year."

View Exams

MSE101 - Introduction to Materials Science

This course introduces the fundamental theory behind materials, their properties, structure, and engineering applications. Topics covered include materials' atomic and crystal structures, phase diagrams, responses to stresses and strains, and deformation mechanisms. Be sure to ask the professor good questions during lecture to get yourself rewarded with sugary treats!

Important Skills

Problem Solving; Memorizing, Theoretical Knowledge.

Tips

  • This course is based on visual learning and so the textbook for this course is essential to better understand the theory since it presents diagrams that substantially clarify concepts.
  • Don't be fooled by the simplicity of the examples done in class and tutorials. The midterm and final exam questions will build off of the same theory but will be more complex.
  • Past exams are your go-to for this course! Professor Ramsay has been teaching the course for years now and the past exams are more representative of the type of difficulty you can expect.
  • There are videos that the professor will publish online giving clarification on topics covered in lecture.

View Exams

MSE160 - Molecules and Materials

This course covers the fundamentals and applications of molecular chemistry and crystallography as it relates to the properties of engineered materials. Material properties from CIV102, inorganic chemistry, and quantum theory are all included.

Important Skills

Memorizing, Theoretical Knowledge, Problem Solving.

Tips

  • This course has a lot of information, make sure you understand and remember all the concepts.
  • Do practice problems to familiarize yourself with approaches to certain problems.
  • Past quizzes will help you know which formulas are important.

View Exams

PHY180 - Classical Mechanics

This course is an introduction to Newtonian mechanics, with a focus on the concepts of force, momentum, and energy. Topics include kinematics, forces, oscillations, energy, momentum, rotation, static equilibrium, and gravitation. Write-ups for the fortnightly labs can be time-consuming, but many students find Prof. Thywissen helpful and approachable.

Important Skills

Problem Solving, Memorizing, Theoretical Knowledge.

Tips

  • The course itself is more like an advanced version of high school physics, however the lectures are the hard part for most people.
  • Do take lab notes and value lab reports! Start labs early and avoid spending too much time on them.
  • Practice questions alone to ensure you know the material."

View Exams